Category Archive: arte ambiental

Charcoal Birds. Vichy, France (2006).

2007. 2′-2′ (circumference). hand made charcoal and raw chalk from the cliffs of Dover.

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Public Resonance: Massada, Isreal (2005)

these works form a part of the series ‘pubic resonance’ where different public works are installed to interpret and otherwise change the surroundings. this work was done while walking the ‘snake trail’ a… Continue reading

Crossing the Atlantic 2007

100 small portraits (2×2.5″) of the sea made while on a cargo vessel from antwerp to montreal for 8 days. this journey was well paced for me, since the clocks went back one… Continue reading

environmental arts mentoring

three people, one of which is 11 years old, draw studies of plants every week in order to learn about environmental arts. can u guess which one was done by the 11 year… Continue reading

sandarchy

A story from the corner store…all the way into a Mongolian sand storm. At the platform created for passengers to wait and be picked up by buses, they have no bathrooms. Not anywhere… Continue reading

tunneling into school

what? why would anyone want to tunnel back into school. well i have no idea, but in the past six years have been investigating how to build living tunnels in school grounds and… Continue reading

helping kids fence their own school?

The Natural History Emporium of Mystery; story and depth of place (captured in a museum display)

This ‘Mapping Nature Museum’ is a old schoolhouse slate, sandblasted with a meticulous map of the Don valley brickworks, beside a display table (installed on a heritage metal lathe) of artifacts and specimens… Continue reading

arrr….coming soon…the pirate survival boat @evergreenbrickworks

pirates will be popping up and learning about the floods in the don valley in the children’s garden at evergreen brickworks this coming spring. will they learn how to survive pirates? or will… Continue reading

guarding the gate of the children’s garden at evergreen brick works…

with sticks grown purposefully in a garden of willow and dogwoods, or as the forester’s of the early british countryside would call, a coppice, this wee beasty overlooks visitors upon entering. see a… Continue reading